Tuesday, September 23, 2014

At Peace with War: Overcoming the Anti-Military Attitude

DePaul University with funding from the McCormick Foundation and other sponsors invited faith-based groups from throughout the Chicago area to participate in the “Multi-Faith Veteran Support Initiative.” I’m glad I went to one of the several orientation events they had, conference-room sized events with followers from a diversity of religions where I felt comfortable bringing up a point. The main kick-off event was just held – about a hundred people or so at the banquet room of the Union League Club. I would say two-thirds or more of the attendees were African-Americans from a handful of church groups. That should not be surprising since the Veterans Administration data shows the majority of veterans live on the south side of the city.

But I felt too intimidated by the preponderance of Christians to say much to anyone. It was hard to engage in conversation with the blacks – as soon as I said I was from the Buddhist temple, they seemed to write me off. The Catholics and United Church of Christ people were more cordial – at least willing to answer the questions I asked them about their work. Though I give DePaul a lot of credit for making their veterans outreach project multi-faith, it’s certainly not something encouraging “interfaith” cooperation.


My main reason for attending the event was to hear the keynote speaker, Rev. Dr. Rita Nakashima Brock (see photo above), because I’ve seen her name on a lot of events here and on the West Coast. She holds the distinction of being the first Asian American woman to earn a doctorate of divinity, but as she told her story to us, it seems she wasn’t brought up to have much identification as Asian (her mother was from Japan). I was disappointed that she spoke of Buddhism in a brief generalized way (not much different from Dr. Haneda lumping all Christians together). She made a reference to Obon but her description would make anyone dismiss it as some superstitious placation of ghosts.

For me the most powerful message from her and the other featured speakers was that in order for organizations to help veterans re-connect with spirituality (Dr. Brock’s concept of “soul repair”) people need to have a better understanding of military life, the life that veterans lived for several years before returning to civilian life. The testimony of many veterans is that God has judged them for being murderers, including those who did not fire weapons, but participated indirectly or even just for surviving attacks that killed their comrades. So going to a church where people feel self-righteous about their relative lack of sin can be painful for veterans seeking a sense of acceptance in the spiritual sense.

I think this is one outreach project where Jodo Shinshu can speak to those veterans dealing with “moral injury” (the term Dr. Brock has popularized to indicate the wounded sense of having violated one’s moral beliefs). Honen and Shinran saw the meanness of their own aristocratic class members denigrating poor working people for breaking Buddhist precepts (e.g. taking life, false speech, having sexual relations). In their teachings they pointed out that because each of us is full of ego-attached defilements, why dump on those who had no choice but to be butchers, tanners, hunters or even prostitutes?

Many Buddhists now put anyone with the military in that “evil person” category. Too many descriptions of “Right Livelihood” in the Eightfold Path say that anything to do with handling weapons (building, selling, using) is forbidden. At one of our Buddhist Council of the Midwest annual gatherings, the Buddhist Peace Fellowship wanted to put out literature and a petition protesting putting in a naval academy program at a local high school. Some of us felt that was something too political to be at our event. To condemn young people (especially from disadvantaged households) who want to consider going into the military is like the anti-abortion protestors who block clinics and terrorize the clients but don’t offer to help people caught in the financial and emotional distress of unwanted pregnancies.

The book Zen at War brought up some poignant discussion and important information about how Buddhist groups in Japan cooperated with the imperial government during World War II, but it had a sanctimonious attitude looking down on anyone participating in military campaigns as unqualified to be a “true” Buddhist. I am not for going to any war, but history and current events show us that war is the reality we must acknowledge. There are many reasons why people join the military and we can’t judge them as moral failures as if our hands are so untainted by the spoils of war. Wars happen because of our greed as consumers, our failure to pay attention to how government officials are interacting with other countries.


I’m not sure how the Buddhist teachings can do the “soul repair” and “acceptance by a non-judgmental higher authority” that Dr. Brock spoke about, since we don’t talk about “souls” and “God.” But maybe for those veterans of any ethnic background who don’t find a reconnection with their spirituality at the Christian centers, our place and other Buddhist temples can give them a sense of being at peace with their past and open to the fresh new moments of the present.

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